Blog | 3 Min Read

Finding Mentorship in the Advisor Community

It should come as little surprise that relationships are a big part of our lives. From family to friends to other loved ones, relationships are a way for us to interact with the world, form healthy connections, and improve our quality of life. But one relationship that proves to be more difficult to sustain is those at work.

A recent study by the National Business Research Institute found that employee’s job satisfaction and engagement increase by 50% when they develop a close relationship with a coworker.

How are you connecting with other advisors? In our world, virtual work is becoming increasingly common. Even if you work in a firm with a close-knit team, it can be tough to find mentorship, accountability, or even a community within the financial planning profession. We would like to encourage you to change that.

Here are some great ways to develop healthy relationships with other advisors in our community.

Connect One-On-One

Seeking professional growth is an important aspect of any job, but especially that of a financial planner. Most times people run their own operation, and even if you have a small team you may find it hard to challenge yourself to grow professionally. That is where a mentor can come in.

Mentors are an excellent resource to help teach and guide you throughout your professional development. A mentor can give advice, introduce you to new people, and help you reach your goals. Often, mentors are further along in their careers than you are, allowing them to help you reach your particular development goals. You can look for a mentor at a conference, meeting, or online group.

If you are looking to work with a mentor, be sure clearly articulate your professional development goals in order to maximize the impact of the relationship. You may want to meet with your mentor once per month or once per quarter depending on both of your schedules. Be sure to make a strong plan for those meetings so that you are really able to learn and grow from the relationship.

Mentorships can come in many forms, one that is particularly popular now is an accountability partner. Unlike a traditional mentor/mentee relationships, accountability partners both take the role of the mentor and the mentee.

Accountability partners learn from each other and, just as it sounds, keep the other person accountable for the goals they set for themselves. This relationship is an excellent way for you to make professional development a priority while also helping others in the community. You could have a monthly call with your accountability partner to go over the progress you are both making toward your goals, roadblocks in the way, and the best strategy for getting around them. One of the most positive outcomes of this type of relationship is an increase in professional engagement and trust. When we embrace more perspectives than just our own, we open ourselves up to immense growth.

Form a Mastermind Group

A mastermind group is a peer-to-peer type of relationship that focuses on gathering multiple people together to solve problems and receive input and advice from the others in the group. These groups combine mentorship, accountability, advice, and education.

Unlike a mentorship or an accountability partner, a mastermind group often has 3 or more members. This hive of ideas can often help advisors solve some of their most pressing problems.

Mastermind groups are all about learning and connecting with other people who work in the same field, share your concerns and problems and work through them together.

Join an Association

Our field offers so many wonderful associations for financial planners to be apart of. They offer conferences, meet ups, and other professional development activities that are so useful for new and seasoned advisors looking for their community. Below are just a few organizations that we love.

  • NAPFA
  • XYPN
  • Fee-only network
  • ACP
  • FPA

Find Common Values

The reason that we connect with people is that we feel like they just get us. That commonality and understanding is the bedrock of any successful professional relationship and one that we at CAP are so proud of.

CAP members are part of a larger “brain trust” community of like-minded advisors who know who we are, what we do, and why we do it. We would love for you to join our community and can’t wait to get to know you, your clients, and your mission.